Education







My Contribution

Usability evaluation

Participatory design

Iterative design

Qualitative research

Problem

Phones are also in different states of repair, with a scratched or shattered screen, a loose Head phone jack, or a battery that can no longer hold a proper charge. Here people might borrow a phone to make a call because they have run out of airtime, to browse the internet because their data-bundle has been depleted, or to take a photo using a better

camera. Particularly in resource-constrained communities, phone-sharing practices are also about resource sharing and not just building and maintaining social and community relationships

Solution

Phones are also in different states of repair, with a scratched or shattered screen, a loose Head phone jack, or a battery that can no longer hold a proper charge. Here people might borrow a phone to make a call because they have run out of airtime, to browse the internet because their data-bundle has been depleted, or to take a photo using a better camera. Particularly in resource-constrained communities, phone-sharing practices are also about resource sharing and not just building and maintaining social and community relationships

Process-

The APPropriate concept emerged through a multi-year design exercise, involving emergent users throughout to generate a range of concepts and prototypes.

Participatory design workshops-

At the start of this research, in June 2015, we carried out a series of participatory design workshops with emergent users in Bangalore, Nairobi and Cape Town, centred around a series of envisioning activities. A total of 49 people took part, with a wide range of ages and backgrounds represented. Activities involved participants sketching, describing and acting out the ideal mobile devices that they might own in the “far-off future” defined as five-to-ten years ahead.

Future technology workshops-

During this session, participants watched the four scenario videos, discussing their benefits, drawbacks and potential problems, and then rated each idea’s usefulness, ranking the four designs in order of preference for us to focus on developing. The most highly rated design was for a device that separated the storage and networking elements of a mobile phone from its display and interface, allowing its owner to use any other device as their own.

Longitudianal Deployments

It was clear after the lab studies that the functionality provided by the APPropriate prototype was highly desired, and that the system as designed would address several of the limitationsthat the emergent users we worked with saw in currentmobile devices. Consequently, we refined the APPropriateprototype and created a version of the Android app and accompanying hardware module that could be deployed for trials in conjunction with users’ own mobile devices. We deployed the APPropriate prototype in Cape Town and Mumbai with groups of emergent users, including several of those who originally participated in the earlier phases of the design process